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Why Electric?


Electric vehicles have no internal combustion engine, instead they are powered by an electric motor and battery pack. Electric vehicles often have the denomination BEV (Battery Electric Vehicle). Battery technologies are improving at an incredible rate, and it is becoming common to see pure electric vehicles achieve a driving range greater than 300 miles, with performance figures to rival some of the very best performance cars.

+ Benefits

- Electric cars offer a smooth and exhilarating driving experience, with maximum torque available on demand.

- No CO2 emissions

- Low running costs

- Tax benefits for both businesses and individuals.

 

A hybrid Vehicle is powered by an electric motor and a traditional petrol or diesel engine. The batteries and electric motors on hybrid vehicles are often very small, and are intended to increase the performance of the engine as opposed to powering the car on their own. Hybrid cars do not require to be charged externally as the battery is topped up via the engine and clever technologies such as brake regeneration.

+ Benefits

- No external charging required.

- Better fuel economy and CO2 emissions than petrol engine equivalent.

A hybrid Vehicle is powered by an electric motor and a traditional petrol or diesel engine. The batteries and electric motors on hybrid vehicles are often very small, and are intended to increase the performance of the engine as opposed to powering the car on their own. Hybrid cars do not require to be charged externally as the battery is topped up via the engine and clever technologies such as brake regeneration.

+ Benefits

- No external charging required.

- Better fuel economy and CO2 emissions than petrol engine equivalent.

 

Although not as common, certain manufacturers produce vehicles that are labelled as REX or Range Extender. These  vehicles are powered purely by a battery and electric motor, but have a regular combustion engine (Most commonly petrol) acting as a generator. This engine does not power the wheels, but simply provides power for the battery.

If you are considering purchasing an electric, plug-in hybrid or range extender Vehicle, it is important to consider how and where you will charge your car.

 

Home

Charging from home is very simple so long as you have the necessary space to allow it. 

Many cars will allow you to charge from a domestic plug socket, however this can be very slow compared to a home charging unit which is readily available from a number of specialist suppliers.

For further information on home charging units available please visit our partner website www.bpchargemaster.co.uk .

Public

Public charging points are readily available and are growing at an incredible rate. There are numerous companies offering charging solutions, and  we recommend to view what is available in your local area before committing to any subscription packages. This information can be found via www.zap-map.com/live/

It is important to remember that hybrid vehicles do not require an external power supply to charge their batteries.

The length of time it takes to charge your car depends on the size of battery and the speed of charger you are using. The below table displays the average charge time based on a 7kWh power supply for some of the most popular electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles sold today.

Home

In order to calculate the cost to charge your car, you will need to know two items;

1. Your Vehicle battery size (kWh)

2. Your home energy providers cost per unit kWh

Please see below an example cost based upon a popular electric Vehicle:

 

Vehicle

Battery Size

Home Energy Avg. kWh unit price (ex VAT)

Full Charge Total Cost

Hyundai Kona Electric

39KwH

14.00 pence per unit

£5.46

The total maximum range for the Hyundai Kona Electric 39kWh is 180 miles. Based upon the above figures the total cost per mile equates to 3.03 pence per mile - A comparable petrol engine averaging 40mpg will cost £1.24 per mile*.

Over a 12 month period, and a total annual mileage of 10,000 miles, opting for the Hyundai Kona Electric will save you a staggering £1115.67 per year.

*Fuel cost based upon £1.25 per litre

Public

The cost to charge at public chargers vary depending on who owns the charging terminals.

Many supermarkets and public parking spaces offer free charging to customers as an incentive to park or use there store. Other providers will normally charge a fee each time you use their chargers. The cost to charge can very between providers. To find out who operates the charging stations near you we recommend using Zap Map www.zap-map.com/live/

You’ll pay company car tax (BIK) if you or your family use a company car privately, including for commuting.

You pay tax on the value to you of the company car, which depends on things like how much it would cost to buy and the type of fuel it uses.

This value of the car is reduced if:

  • You have it part-time
  • You pay something towards its cost
  • It has low CO2 emissions

If your employer pays for fuel you use for personal journeys, you’ll pay tax on this separately.

To calculate how much tax you will have to pay, please click on the below link (Provided by HMRC):

Calculate Your Company Car Tax

Public Charging

There are many charging stations throughout the UK, with more being added on a weekly basis. To find your nearest station a searchable map of the UK’s ever growing network of public charging points can be found at Zap Map - www.zap-map.com

 

Home Charging

The majority of electric and Plug_in Electric vehicles can be charged via a domestic 3 pin plug socket. However, this is the slowest method of charging and we therefore recommend installing an electric car charge point. There are a number of companies offering this service, and with a range of government incentives, the cost of installation is very affordable and in some cases free of charge.

 

We can recommend Charge Master (www.bpchargemaster.com)  as a useful contact for this service.

The length of time it takes to charge your car depends on the size of battery and the speed of charger you are using.  The below information details the average charge time for the three main types of charging units

 

Slow Charge (3 Pin Domestic Plug) - This charge type is available within all UK homes. A full charge for an average electric vehicle will take approximately 10-12 hours.

 

Fast Charge (7kW) - Widely available for use at either public charging points, or dedicated home chargers. A full charge for an average electric vehicle will take approximately 4-5 hours

 

Rapid Charge - Usually only available at dedicated charging stations, a rapid charger will charge an average electric car to an 80% capacity within 30 minutes.

Home Charging

 

In order to calculate the cost to charge your car, you will need to know two items;

 

1. Your vehicle battery size (kWh)

2. Your home energy providers cost per unit kWh

 

Please see below an example cost based upon a popular electric vehicle:

 

Vehicle

Battery Size

Home Energy Avg. kWh unit price (ex VAT)

Full Charge Total Cost

Hyundai Kona Electric

39KwH

14.00 pence per unit

£5.46

 

The total maximum range for the Hyundai Kona Electric 39kWh is 180 miles. Based upon the above figures the total cost per mile equates to 3.03 pence per mile - A comparable petrol engine averaging 40mpg will cost £1.24 per mile*.

Over a 12 month period, and a total annual mileage of 10,000 miles, opting for the Hyundai Kona Electric will save you a staggering £1115.67 per year or £92.97 per month

*Fuel cost based upon £1.25 per litre

Public Charging

The cost to charge at public chargers vary depending on who owns the charging terminals.

Many supermarkets and public parking spaces offer free charging to customers as an incentive to park or use their store. Other providers will normally charge a fee each time you use their charging points.  The cost to charge can very between providers. To find out who operates the charging stations near you we recommend using Zap Map www.zap-map.com/live/

Grants for electric vehicles

The Government are keen to encourage us to ‘make the switch’, and start enjoying the many benefits of electric motoring. To make this easier, there are a number of generous grants available.

 

Up to £3,500 off an eligible new car

 

We know that new cars can seem expensive. The Government’s Plug-in Car grant is designed to help overcome this, by giving you up to £3,500 off the ‘on the road’ price of an eligible new 100% electric car, and up to £8,000 off the price of a new electric van. In many cases this brings the price of electric cars and vans in-line with their equivalent petrol or diesel models.

In order to be eligible for the Plug-in Car Grant, cars must have CO2 emissions of less than 50g/km and have a zero emission range of at least 70 miles.

 

Benefiting from the grant is easy – as you don’t really have to do anything. When you buy your new car, the dealership will complete all of the paperwork on your behalf at point of purchase. The grant is administered by the Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV) and they have set a number of criteria that eligible cars have to meet; these include ensuring all cars meet certain safety requirements.

You can also access a Plug-in Grant if you need a van. The grant will give you up to £8,000 off the price of an eligible van. Again, applied as you buy.

 

Information on cars and vans eligible for the Grant is available here.

 

If you’re still concerned, it’s worth remembering that there are a wide range of finance and leasing options available on electric cars, spreading the cost across more manageable monthly payments. With some models you can even consider buying the car and leasing the battery, lowering the initial purchase price and giving you complete peace of mind for the lifetime of your battery.

 

Up to £500 grants for charging

 

If you are regularly going to charge at home, installing an authorised home charging unit is the fastest, easiest and safest way to charge your car – and comes with a Government grant of up to £500 towards the cost of installation. To qualify, you need to be the registered keeper, lessee or have primary use of an eligible electric vehicle, with dedicated off-street parking.

 

If you don’t have a driveway or garage, you can still get help for a charge post on your street. The Government has directed funds for local authorities to enable them to respond to resident requests for on-street residential charging solutions. Ask your local council whether it is participating in this scheme. To find out more, please click here.

 

To make commuting in your Go Ultra Low car even easier, the Workplace Charging Scheme also enables any business, charity or public authority to claim a grant of up to £500 per charging socket towards the cost of installing EV charge points, providing they have dedicated off-street parking for staff.

 

Please click here to find out more about the OLEV charging grants available.

 

Local bonuses

 

It is worth exploring your local area to see what regional initiatives you could benefit from. In London, Go Ultra Low cars receive a 100% discount from the London Congestion Charge, saving up to £11.50 per day. Go Ultra Low vehicles benefit from discounted or free parking at various handy locations in a number of regions. This allows you free or lower-cost parking when visiting the local high street or even driving to meetings.

The abbreviation BEV stands for Battery Electric Vehicle BEV is a common way to refer to a car that is pure electric.

The abbreviation P-HEV stands for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle.

These types of vehicles have both an internal combustion engine and an electric motor that can provide power to the wheels. The size of the battery pack within plug-in hybrid vehicles is normally a lot smaller than those that are full electric. The total electric range of these cars is therefore lower, normally around 30-60 miles.

In a word, Yes!

The electric motor has very few moving parts, and requires less serving requirements compared to a petrol/diesel engine equivalent. Because of this, electric cars have very good reliability ratings.

Yes, an electric car will still need to be services at regular intervals.

 

However, there are far  fewer parts that need be changed compared to a petrol or diesel equivalent. For example, an electric car uses no oil and oil filters, has no spark plugs, and has no conventional clutch. Until the battery needs replacing (Most batteries are under warranty for 10+ years) your biggest outlay is most likely going to be new tyres.

 

The cost of servicing an electric car, is therefore much cheaper than that of a petrol/diesel engine equivalent.

Most manufacturers will have a battery warranty of around 10 years. Within this time frame, they normally allow a reduction in battery capacity of 20%.

 

Battery technology is forever improving, with more and more companies investing heavily into new technologies. it is therefore reasonable to expect new batteries to have far a longer lifespans.

Yes, electric cars are as safe and in a lot of circumstances safer on average than petrol or diesel car equivalents.

 

The lack of flammable liquids and mechanical components, allows the manufacturer to develop a strong body structure which performs well under crash testing.

Each finance provider insists you service your vehicle in line with the manufacturer guidelines, using approved repair centres. It is very important that you therefore factor in these costs, over and above your regular monthly lease payment. Some of the items that may need completing include the following:

 

  • Routine Servicing
  • MOT
  • Replacement Tyres
  • Brake Pads
  • Wiper Blades
  • Other wear and tear items

 

To make things as simple as possible we are able to offer a maintenance package, paid in fixed monthly instalments, that covers the cost of all of these items plus many more.

We are able to offer maintenance packages via your lease provider, and also by our specialist maintenance provider Autoserve. 

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